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Anti-Inflammatory, Bronchodilator and Combination Medication

NOTE: This resource is designed to provide a concise introduction to a variety of screening, diagnostic, and treatment procedures. All animations in the Procedures InMotion resource are physician-reviewed and reflect the most up-to-date, evidence-based information. Relevant sources are provided for each animation.

The information provided here is intended to offer a general idea of what to expect when you undergo a particular procedure. Some details have been intentionally omitted to make the animation more accessible. Specific details, including length of the procedure, duration of the hospital stay, and the surgical techniques used can vary based on the severity of your condition, your doctor's experience, the hospital's protocol, and other factors. Be sure to thoroughly discuss the details of your procedure with your doctor beforehand.


Transcript

Your doctor may prescribe several types of medication to treat your asthma. Two of these are anti-inflammatories, and bronchodilators. Both anti-inflammatories and bronchodilators work to open up your airways, but they do so in different ways.

Anti-inflammatory medications decrease airway sensitivity caused by inflammation, and reduce mucus production. Bronchodilators relax the constricted muscles around your airways. This action opens them up, making it easier to breathe, and easier for the mucus to be expelled.

Both anti-inflammatories and bronchodilators can be prescribed as either controller medication, medicine that you take every day to prevent long-term sensitivity; or quick-relief medication, medicine for the relief of sudden asthma attacks.

In some cases, your healthcare provider may prescribe a combination medication that has the properties of both anti-inflammatories and bronchodilators. Combination medications can make your asthma management easier because you to only use one medication, instead of two.

One dose of a combination medicine does the job of both an anti-inflammatory and a bronchodilator. It decreases inflammation, reduces constriction and helps to loosen mucus. Loose mucus is easier to cough out of your system.

Like all medicines, asthma medications only work when you take them as prescribed. So review your prescriptions with your doctor or pharmacist, and make sure you follow them correctly.

"I’m on a maintenance program right now - which is two clicks is what they call it - of Pulmicort®, which in three years I’ve only had one situation. I feel very good about that. But I have to take the Pulmicort® daily."

If your medications are not working as expected, or you feel you may be experiencing medication side effects, tell your doctor right away. Your medication plan may need to be changed.

Animation Copyright © Milner-Fenwick

Please be aware that this information is provided to supplement the care provided by your physician. It is neither intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. CALL YOUR HEALTHCARE PROVIDER IMMEDIATELY IF YOU THINK YOU MAY HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider prior to starting any new treatment or with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.

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