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Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to destroy cancer cells and shrink tumors. In general, radiation therapy is not useful for treating melanoma. In some cases, it may be used after surgery to prevent the spread or recurrence of cancer. Radiation therapy may be useful in easing symptoms created by metastatic melanoma.

If radiation therapy is an option, a radiation oncologist will customize the treatment dose for individual needs. The goal is to try and kill as much cancer as possible while minimizing harm to healthy tissue.

External Beam Radiation

In external beam radiation therapy, a machine directs high-energy rays through the body and into the tumor. The radiation oncologist will discuss options, doses, and frequency of radiation so that the highest amount of radiation can be delivered to the cancer with as little impact on healthy tissue as possible.

Radiation of a Tumor


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Stereotactic radiosurgery is a type of external radiation therapy. This method allows delivery of higher doses of radiation because it can precisely deliver it to the tumor and not healthy tissue. The precise delivery may also require fewer doses than traditional radiation therapy.

Side Effects and Management

Complications of radiation therapy depend on where it is directed, and may include:

  • Chest complications:
    • Cough
    • Shortness of breath
    • Problems swallowing or eating
  • Abdominal and pelvic complications:
    • Bladder irritation—may cause blood in the urine, or pain or burning during urination
    • Anal or rectal irritiation—may cause blood in the stool, pain during bowel movements, or stool leakage
    • Vaginal dryness— may cause discomfort during intercourse
    • Erectile dysfunction
    • Infertility—talk to your doctor about options to preserve fertility before starting treatment

A variety of treatments are available to help manage side effects of radiation therapy, such as dry, irritated skin, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and fatigue due to anemia. Sometimes adjustments to treatment doses may also be possible. The earlier side effects are addressed, the more likely they will be controlled with a minimum of discomfort.

References:

Melanoma. EBSCO DynaMed Plus website. Available at: http://www.dynamed.com/topics/dmp~AN~T115302/Melanoma. Updated August 26, 2016. Accessed October 18, 2016.

Melanoma. Merck Manual Professional Version website. Available at: http://www.merckmanuals.com/professional/dermatologic-disorders/cancers-of-the-skin/melanoma. Updated July 2015. Accessed October 18, 2016.

Melanoma skin cancer. American Cancer Society website. Available at: http://www.cancer.org/acs/groups/cid/documents/webcontent/003120-pdf.pdf. Accessed October 18, 2016.

Mendenhall WM, Amdur RJ, Grobmyer SR, et al. Adjuvant radiotherapy for cutaneous melanoma. Cancer. 2008;112(6):1189-1196.

Treatment option overview. National Cancer Institute website. Available at: https://www.cancer.gov/types/skin/patient/melanoma-treatment-pdq#section/_135. Updated July 22, 2016. Accessed October 18, 2016.



Last reviewed March 2016 by Mohei Abouzied, MD

Please be aware that this information is provided to supplement the care provided by your physician. It is neither intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. CALL YOUR HEALTHCARE PROVIDER IMMEDIATELY IF YOU THINK YOU MAY HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider prior to starting any new treatment or with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.

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